Loading... Please wait...

Today's Top Science News

Today's Top Science News

NASA water vapor imagery shows Tino's heavy rain potential over Fiji
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Tino.

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature
The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb -- as young as 11 weeks after conception -- already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. This first-time finding deepens the mystery of how the microbes or microbial products reach those organs before birth and what role they play in normal lung and immune system development.

When David poses as Goliath
Observations have shown that stellar black holes typically have masses of about ten times that of the Sun. Recently, Chinese astronomers claimed to have discovered a black hole as massive as 70 solar masses, which, if confirmed, would challenge the current view of stellar evolution. Astronomers from the Universities of Erlangen-Nürnberg and Potsdam discovered that it may not necessarily be a black hole at all, but possibly a massive neutron star or an 'ordinary' star.

UVA engineering professor Jack W. Davidson named an IEEE fellow
UVA Engineering computer science professor Jack W. Davidson has been named an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow in recognition of his contributions to compilers, computer security and computer science education.

UVA professor Matthew B. Dwyer named a fellow by the Association for Computing Machinery
The Association for Computing Machinery has named Matthew B. Dwyer, a University of Virginia professor of computer science, a fellow. Fellowships are conferred to association members for technological accomplishments that help define the digital age and improve professional and personal lives. Association for Computing Machinery Fellows comprise an elite group that represents less than 1% of the association's global membership.

NJIT scientists measure the evolving energy of a solar flare's explosive first minutes
In 2017, a massive new region of magnetic field erupted on the sun's surface next to an existing sunspot. The powerful collision of magnetic energy produced a series of solar flares, causing turbulent space weather conditions at Earth. Scientists have now pinpointed for the first time exactly when and where the explosion released the energy that heated spewing plasma to energies equivalent to 1 billion degrees in temperature.

Reward improves visual perceptual learning -- but only after people sleep
A new study from Brown researchers finds that rewards improve performance on a visual perceptual task only if participants sleep after training.

Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity
Traditional methods of vacuum suction and previous vacuum suction devices cannot maintain suction on rough surfaces due to vacuum leakage, which leads to suction failure. Researchers Xin Li and Kaige Shi developed a zero-pressure difference method to enhance the development of vacuum suction units. Their method overcame leakage limitations by using a high-speed rotating water ring between the surface and suction cup to maintain the vacuum. They discuss their work in Physics of Fluids.

Study: Critical care improvements may differ depending on hospital's patient population
A new study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that while critical care outcomes in ICUs steadily improved over a decade at hospitals with few minority patients, ICUs with a more diverse patient population did not progress comparably.

New scheduling tool offers both better flight choices and increased airline profits
Researchers from Dartmouth and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an original approach to flight scheduling that, if implemented, could result in a significant increase in profits for airlines and more flights that align with passengers' preferences. The approach is presented in a paper, 'Airline Timetable Development and Fleet Assignment Incorporating Passenger Choice,' recently published in Transportation Science, the leading journal in the field of transportation analysis.

Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are important building blocks for synthesis products to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, the conversion of substances commonly used in industry often results in the loss of the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule. Chemists at Münster University now introduce carbon-carbon couplings in which the boron atom is retained. The study has been published in the journal Chem.

Researchers find that cookies increase ad revenue for online publishers
How long has it been since you logged onto a Web site and you were prompted to decide whether to opt out of 'cookies' that the site told you will enhance your online experience? Minutes? Hours?

Study: Neuron found in mice could have implications for effective diet drugs
A CALCR cell found in mice may stop feeding without subsequential nauseating effects, as well as influence the long term intake of food.

Not all of nature's layered structures are tough as animal shells and antlers, study finds
Engineers looking to nature for inspiration have long assumed that layered structures like those found in mollusk shells enhance a material's toughness, but a study shows that's not always the case. The findings may help engineers avoid 'naive biomimicry, the researchers say.

Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors
Acid reflux drugs that are sometimes recommended to ease stomach problems during cancer treatment may have an unintended side effect: impairment of breast cancer survivors' memory and concentration.

Programmable nests for cells
Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed novel programmable materials. These nanocomposites can be tailored to various applications and programmed to degrade quickly and gently. For medical applications, they can create environments in which human stem cells can settle down and develop further. Additionally, they are suited for the setup of biohybrid systems to produce power, for instance. The results are presented in Nature Communications and on the bioRxiv platform.

3D printing with applications in the pharmaceutical industry
This achievement will have applications in the pharmaceutical industry, such as in the preparation of biocompatible biosensors based in gold, which have already been shown to be effective in the detection of carcinogenic cells and tumour biomarkers.

Research shows real risks associated with cannabis exposure during pregnancy
A new study from researchers at Western University and Queen's University is the first to definitively show that regular exposure to THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, during pregnancy has significant impact on placental and fetal development. With more than a year since the legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada, the effects of its use during pregnancy are only now beginning to be understood.

The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you
Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy.

It takes more than two to tango: Microbial communities influence animal sex and reproduction
It is an awkward idea, but a couple's ability to have kids may partly depend on who else is present. The reproductive tracts of males and females contain whole communities of micro-organisms. These microbes can have considerable impact on (animal) fertility and reproduction, as shown by Melissah Rowe, from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), and co-authors this week with an extensive overview in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. It may even lead to new species.

Violence and adversity in early life can alter the brain
But social supports can reduce the negative effects of childhood stress. Childhood adversity is a significant problem in the US, particularly for children growing up in poverty. Those who experience poverty have a much higher risk of being exposed to violence and suffering from a lack of social support, which can have long-term consequences including higher rates of diabetes, cancer, and other diseases.

Miniature double glazing
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz and the University of Bayreuth have jointly developed and characterized a novel, extremely thin and transparent material that has different thermal conduction properties depending on the direction. While it can conduct heat extremely well in one direction, it shows good thermal insulation in the other direction.

Psychedelic drugs could help treat PTSD
Clinical trials suggest treatment that involves psychedelics can be more effective than psychotherapy alone. More than three million people in the United States are diagnosed each year with post-traumatic stress disorder, whose symptoms include nightmares or unwanted memories of trauma, heightened reactions, anxieties, and depression--and can last months, or even years.

The core of massive dying galaxies already formed 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang
The most distant dying galaxy discovered so far, more massive than our Milky Way -- with more than a trillion stars -- has revealed that the 'cores' of these systems had formed already 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, about 1 billion years earlier than previous measurements revealed. The discovery will add to our knowledge on the formation of the Universe more generally, and may cause the computer models astronomers use, one of the most fundamental tools, to be revised

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago
The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

Artificial intelligence to improve resolution of brain magnetic resonance imaging
Researchers of the ICAI Group -Computational Intelligence and Image Analysis- of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed an unprecedented method that is capable of improving brain images obtained through magnetic resonance imaging using artificial intelligence.

Molecules move faster on a rough terrain
Contrary to what one might think, molecules can move faster in the proximity of rougher surfaces. This is the conclusion of a research, published in Physical Review Letters by researchers from Université libre de Bruxelles.

Chemists have managed to stabilize the 'capricious' phosphorus
An international team of Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian scientists has identified an effective strategy to improve the stability of two-dimensional black phosphorus, which is a promising material for use in optoelectronics.

Digital athletics in analogue stadiums
Why do people pay money travel to big arenas to watch people sit in chairs and stare into screens? What are they getting in real life that they can't get from streaming it online? Researchers in Finland have studied for the first time what motivates the 'in real life' consumption of e-sports.

Rethinking interactions with mental health patients
New research overturns the belief that people with severe mental illness are incapable of effective communication with their psychiatrist, and are able to work together with them to achieve better outcomes for themselves.

Charge model for calculating the photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators
Japanese researchers have developed a charge model to describe photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photoexcited states and calculating large-system, optical conductivity spectra that can be compared with experimental results.

Rich rewards: Scientists reveal ADHD medication's effect on the brain
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified how certain areas of the human brain respond to methylphenidate -- a stimulant drug which is used to treat symptoms of ADHD. The work may help researchers understand the precise mechanism of the drug and ultimately develop more targeted medicines for the condition.

Transformational innovation needed to reach global forest restoration goals
New research finds that global South countries have pledged the largest areas of land to forest restoration, and are also farthest behind in meeting their targets due to challenging factors such as population growth, corruption, and deforestation. 'We've identified countries that need help, not failures,' says UMBC's Matt Fagan. With the right kind of international support -- that listens to locals and generates creative solutions -- communities can implement policy that will make positive change.

Microplastics affect sand crabs' mortality and reproduction, PSU study finds
Sand crabs, a key species in beach ecosystems, were found to have increased adult mortality and decreased reproductive success when exposed to plastic microfibers, according to a new Portland State University study.

Here and gone: Outbound comets are likely of alien origin
Astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have analyzed the paths of two objects heading out of the Solar System forever and determined that they also most likely originated from outside of the Solar System. These results improve our understanding of the outer Solar System and beyond.

Internet use reduces study skills in university students
Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.

Study quashes controversial vitamin C treatment for sepsis with global trial
A paper published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Monash researchers comprehensively quashes the idea that the vitamin C-based cocktail has any positive impact on patients with sepsis.

America's most widely consumed oil causes genetic changes in the brain
New UC Riverside research shows soybean oil not only leads to obesity and diabetes, but could also affect neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, and depression.

Long-term risks cast further doubt on the use of Viagra for fetal therapy
University of Manchester scientists investigating a possible treatment for fetal growth restriction (FGR), a condition in which babies grow poorly in the womb, have urged further caution on the use of Viagra.The drug, commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction, as it enhances blood flow -- has been undergoing trials as a potential treatment for FGR. However, in a recent study in mice, Viagra showed no improvement in fetal growth but did result in high blood pressure in the pups as they reached maturity.

Study traces evolution of acoustic communication
A study tracing acoustic communication across the tree of life of land-living vertebrates reveals that the ability to vocalize goes back hundreds of millions of years, is associated with a nocturnal lifestyle and has remained stable. Surprisingly, acoustic communication does not seem to drive the formation of new species across vertebrates.

Green in tooth and claw
Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors' diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

PEPTIC trial comparing strategies to prevent stress ulcers in ICU patients needing mechanical ventilation
Researchers report on a randomized clinical trial that compared two strategies (proton pump inhibitors vs. histamine-2 receptor blockers) to prevent stress ulcers among adult patients in intensive care units who needed mechanical ventilation. The trial was conducted at 50 ICUs in five countries to compare in-hospital death rates using the two strategies. The study is being released to coincide with presentation at the Critical Care Reviews Meeting 2020 in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Observational study explores fish oil supplements, testicular function in healthy young men
An observational study of nearly 1,700 young healthy Danish men looked at how fish oil supplements were associated with testicular function as measured by semen quality and reproductive hormone levels. Limitations of this study include a lack of information on the actual concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in the fish oil supplements self-reported by the men. Researchers suggest randomized clinical trials are needed.

VITAMINS trial report on vitamin C, hydrocortisone, thiamine for septic shock
In this randomized clinical trial of about 200 patients with septic shock, combination treatment with intravenous vitamin C, hydrocortisone and thiamine compared with intravenous hydrocortisone alone didn't significantly improve the amount of time patients were alive and free of medicines that raise blood pressure (vasopressors) over seven days. The study findings are being released to coincide with presentation at the Critical Care Reviews Meeting 2020 in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Sanitary care by social ants shapes disease outcome
Sanitary care in ants to fight disease is known to improve the wellbeing of the colony, yet it has been unclear how social disease defense interferes with pathogen competition inside the individual host body. In their recent study published in Ecology Letters, Sylvia Cremer and her research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) revealed that collective care-giving has the power to bias the outcome of coinfections in fungus-exposed colony members.

Cheap drug may alleviate treatment-resistance in leukemia
A common and inexpensive drug may be used to counteract treatment resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most common forms of blood cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in mice and human blood cells performed at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab and published in the medical journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The researchers will now launch a clinical study to test the new combination treatment in patients.

How sensitive can a quantum detector be?
Measuring the energy of quantum states requires detecting energy changes so exceptionally small they are hard to pick out from background fluctuations, like using only a thermometer to try and work out if someone has blown out a candle in the room you're in. New research in Nature Communications from a team in Finland presents sensitive quantum thermometry hitting the bounds that nature allows.

Climate may play a bigger role than deforestation in rainforest biodiversity
In a study on small mammal biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest, researchers found that climate may affect biodiversity in rainforests even more than deforestation does.

Psychology program for refugee children improves wellbeing
A positive psychology program created by researchers at Queen Mary University of London focuses on promoting wellbeing in refugee children. It is unusual in that it focuses on promoting positive outcomes, rather than addressing war trauma exposure.

Study finds disparity in critical care deaths between non-minority and minority hospitals
While deaths steadily declined over a decade in intensive care units at hospitals with few minority patients, in ICUs with large numbers of minority patients, there was less improvement, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

'Melting rock' models predict mechanical origins of earthquakes
Engineers at Duke University have devised a model that can predict the early mechanical behaviors and origins of an earthquake in multiple types of rock. The model provides new insights into unobservable phenomena that take place miles beneath the Earth's surface under incredible pressures and temperatures, and could help researchers better predict earthquakes -- or even, at least theoretically, attempt to stop them.

New dog, old tricks? Stray dogs can understand human cues
Pet dogs are highly receptive to commands from their owners. But is this due to their training or do dogs have an innate ability to understand human signals? A new study finds that 80% of untrained stray dogs successfully followed pointing directions from people to a specific location. The results suggest that dogs can understand and respond to complex gestures without any training, meaning that dogs may have an innate connection to human behaviors.

Novel protein positioning technique improves functionality of yeast cells
A research team at Kobe University has developed a method of artificially controlling the anchorage position of target proteins in engineered baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The group demonstrated that this technique could be utilized to improve the amount of ethanol produced from hydrothermally processed rice straw by 30%. It is expected that these results will contribute to improved yeast functionality in cell surface engineering, which is utilized in a variety of fields such as bio-production and medicine.

Focus on opioids and cannabis in chronic pain media coverage
New Zealand media reports on chronic pain are focusing on treatments involving opioids and cannabis at the expense of best practice non-drug treatments, researchers have found.

POSTECH developed self-assembled artificial microtubule like LEGO building blocks
Professor Kimoon Kim and his research team identified a new hierarchical self-assembly mechanism

ISSCR statement on ethical standards for stem cell-based embryo models
The ISSCR is updating its Guidelines to respond to recent scientific advances that include the use of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to create models of early human embryo development (see Stem Cell Reports 14:1-6). As the science continues to advance, it raises important scientific, clinical, ethical, and societal issues for researchers, regulators, and funding agencies. The ISSCR believes the scientific community must address these challenges to establish parameters for research in this area.

UTSW researchers uncover new vulnerability in kidney cancer
Qing Zhang, Ph.D., and his colleagues identified a possible way to treat tumors while sparing nearby healthy tissue.

Estrogen may facilitate the growth of liver metastases in non-sex-specific cancers
A study led by Dr. Pnina Brodt shows that the liver immune microenvironment reacts to metastatic cells differently in male and that in female mice and estrogen can indirectly contribute to the growth of metastases. These findings provide a rationale for further exploration of the role of sex hormones in female cancer patients and the potential benefits of anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen in the treatment of hormone-independent cancers that metastasize to the liver.

Helping patients prep mind and body for surgery pays off, study suggests
An inexpensive program to help surgery patients get physically and mentally ready for their upcoming operation may help reduce overall costs and get them home faster, according to new research involving hundreds of patients in 21 hospitals.

Mix of stress and air pollution may lead to cognitive difficulties in children
Children with elevated exposure to early life stress in the home and elevated prenatal exposure to air pollution exhibited heightened symptoms of attention and thought problems, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia Psychiatry. Early life stress is common in youth from disadvantaged backgrounds who also often live in areas with greater exposure to air pollution.

Edible 'security tag' to protect drugs from counterfeit
Purdue University researchers are aiming to stump drug counterfeiters with an edible 'security tag' embedded into medicine. To imitate the drug, a counterfeiter would have to uncrack a complicated puzzle of patterns not fully visible to the naked eye.

Brain imaging may improve diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders
Brain imaging may one day be used to help diagnose mental health disorders--including depression and anxiety--with greater accuracy, according to a new study conducted in a large sample of youth at the University of Pennsylvania and led by Antonia Kaczkurkin, PhD and Theodore Satterthwaite, MD.

New study identifies potential path forward for brachial plexus injury recovery
The study has identified a strategy that may support the regeneration of nerves affected by the injury.

Older undiagnosed sleep apnea patients need more medical care
Older adults with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea seek more health care, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The study examined the impact of untreated sleep apnea on health care utilization and costs among Medicare beneficiaries.

Study finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal'
US and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research appears this week in Science and provides the strongest direct evidence to date of entanglement's role in bringing about quantum criticality.

Improved brain chip for precision medicine
The Akay Lab biomedical research team at the University of Houston is reporting an improvement on a microfluidic brain cancer chip previously developed in their lab. The new chip allows quick assessment of the effectiveness of cancer drugs on brain tumors.

A secreted signature of aging cells
Senescent cells undergo an irreversible and permanent arrest of cell division and are hallmarks of both the aging process and multiple chronic diseases. Senescent cells -- and more importantly the factors they secrete, known collectively as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) -- are widely accepted as drivers of aging and multiple age-related diseases.

Low doses of radiation used in medical imaging lead to mutations in cell cultures
Common medical imaging procedures use low doses of radiation that are believed to be safe. A new study, however, finds that in human cell cultures, these doses create breaks that allow extra bits of DNA to integrate into the chromosome. Roland Kanaar and Alex Zelensky of Erasmus University Medical Center and Oncode Institute and colleagues report these new findings in a study published 16th January in PLOS Genetics.

The carbon footprint of dinner: How 'green' are fish sticks?
Fish sticks may be a tasty option for dinner, but are they good for the planet? A new study of the climate impacts of seafood products reveals that the processing of Alaskan pollock into fish sticks, imitation crab, and fish fillets generates significant greenhouse gas emissions.

NASA catches the dissipation of Tropical Cyclone Claudia
Tropical Cyclone Claudia was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of storm as it flew overhead in its orbit around the Earth.

How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality
Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development -- buildings, roads and the utilities that support them -- within a defined area. These boundaries are intended to decrease negative impacts on people and the environment. However, according to a Penn State researcher, policies that aim to reduce urban sprawl may be increasing water pollution.

Attentiveness and trust are especially effective in combating juvenile crime
The criminologist Professor Klaus Boers (University of Münster) and the sociologist Professor Jost Reinecke (University of Bielefeld) have presented the results of their long-term study 'Crime in the modern city.' The scientists have observed and analyzed the delinquency behavior of around 3,000 young people in German cities for almost 20 years.

Are bigger brains better?
When it comes to certain parts of the brain, bigger doesn't necessarily equate to better memory.

New optical technique captures real-time dynamics of cement setting
Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid in the development of optimized types of cement with less impact on the environment.

Organized cybercrime -- not your average mafia
Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year.

Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that cancer-causing MLL gene may also push pluripotent stem cells to make hematopoietic stem cells, a strong step in the decades-long effort to make personalizable, durable blood stem cells.

What's MER? A new way to measure quantum materials
Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it -- magneto-elastoresistance, or MER.

Fossil is the oldest-known scorpion
Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both ancient oceans and on land.

Study unravels new insights into a Parkinson's disease protein
The new study explores alpha-synuclein's basic properties, with a focus on a section of the protein known as the non-amyloidal component (NAC). The research was done on fruit fly larvae that were genetically engineered to produce both normal and mutated forms of human alpha-synuclein.

Colloidal Quantum Dot Photodetectors can now see further than before
An ICFO study published in Nanoletters reports on the development of a colloidal quantum dot photodetector capable of detecting light in the far infrared.

Quantum physics: Controlled experiment observes self-organized criticality
Researchers from Cologne, Heidelberg, Strasbourg and California have observed important characteristics of complex systems in a lab experiment. Their discovery could facilitate the development of quantum technologies.

Mortality rate is cut in half by a lung rescue team at Massachusetts General
A specialized Lung Rescue Team established to evaluate and treat patients with obesity receiving mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure has significantly reduced the risk of mortality

'Living fossil' may upend basic tenet of evolutionary theory
A UC San Francisco-led research team has discovered the first conclusive evidence that selection may also occur at the level of the epigenome -- a term that refers to an assortment of chemical "annotations" to the genome that determine whether, when and to what extent genes are activated -- and has done so for tens of millions of years.

Less active infants had greater fat accumulation, study finds
Less physical activity for infants below one year of age may lead to more fat accumulation which in turn may predispose them to obesity later in life, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Bartonella bacteria found in hemangiosarcoma tumors from dogs
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a very high prevalence of Bartonella bacteria in tumors and tissues - but not blood samples - taken from dogs with hemangiosarcoma, a cancer of the blood vessels.

Head/neck cancer diagnosis, time to treatment after ACA Medicaid expansions
Researchers for this observational study examined the association between the expansion of Medicaid coverage in some states after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed and the diagnosis and treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The analysis included nearly 91,000 adults with newly diagnosed HNSCC who were identified from the National Cancer Database.

January Alzheimer's & Dementia highlights: Sleep, race/ethnicity, artificial intelligence
Phase 3 drug trial results on improving sleep for persons living with Alzheimer's disease. The US Hispanic/Latino population is predicted to have the largest increase in Alzheimer's and all dementia by mid-century. Artificial intelligence may help with early detection of dementia.

Crop residues are a potential source of beneficial microorganisms and biocontrol agents
While studies of the microbiomes (which comprises all the microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi) of the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of plants are important, scientists at INRA believe more attention should be given to the microbiomes of crop residues.

Research shows that older patients with untreated sleep apnea need greater medical care
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and costly medical Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that the medical costs are substantially higher among older adults who go untreated for obstructive sleep apnea.

Walnuts may be good for the gut and help promote heart health
Researchers found that eating walnuts daily as part of a healthy diet was associated with increases in certain bacteria that can help promote health. Additionally, those changes in gut bacteria were associated with improvements in some risk factors for heart disease.

Pretty with a twist
Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they also exhibit exceptional properties.

A wearable gas sensor for health and environmental monitoring
A highly sensitive, wearable gas sensor for environmental and human health monitoring may soon become commercially available, according to researchers at Penn State and Northeastern University.

New hospital-based data contradicts HUD estimates on homelessness
Illinois hospital visits associated with homelessness have tripled since 2011 and conservative estimates of homelessness using hospital-based data exceeded similar estimates from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD.

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together
For the first time, research shows that the contacts between cells, known as cell adhesion, are essential for cells to survive stress. The findings also suggest that impaired cell adhesion may sensitize cancer cells to drugs that damage cell proteins and cause stress.

Most youths surviving opioid overdose not getting timely treatment to avoid recurrence
A study of more than 4 million Medicaid claims records during a recent seven-year period concludes that less than a third of the nearly 3,800 US adolescents and young adults who experienced a nonfatal opioid overdose got timely (within 30 days) follow-up addiction treatment to curb or prevent future misuse and reduce the risk of a second overdose.

Menthol ban could increase health equity
Current policies that include restrictions on the sale of menthol flavored tobacco and nicotine products are less likely to reach those that would benefit from them the most, according to new research from the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine.

Virtual physical therapy after knee replacement brings similar outcomes, lower costs
A virtual system for in-home physical therapy (PT) provides good outcomes for patients undergoing rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) -- with lower costs than traditional in-person PT, reports a study in the Jan. 15, 2020, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Progress in unraveling the mystery of the genomics of Parkinson's disease
The International Parkinson Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) has now been in existence for ten years. In an article published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease the consortium reviews the progress made over the past decade in the genomics of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders including Lewy body diseases, progressive supranuclear palsy, and multiple system atrophy and looks ahead at its future direction and research priorities.

Physicists design 'super-human' red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets
A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's.

A new look at 'strange metals'
'Strange metals' could be the key to finally understanding high-temperature superconductors. After years of research, scientists have now found a way to analyze these materials, answering important questions in materials science.

 

newsletter


Copyright 2020 Arellon.com. All Rights Reserved.
 Sitemap | Bigcommerce Premium Themes by PSDCenter