Loading... Please wait...

Today's Top Science News

Today's Top Science News

Scientists sound the alarm: Lockdowns may escalate the obesity epidemic
Emotional stress, economic anxiety, physical inactivity and social distance - locking down society to combat COVID-19 creates psychosocial insecurity that leads to obesity, warn three Danish researchers. Counter measures are needed if we are to keep the public both metabolically healthy and safe from the coronavirus

When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile -- how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles.

How do we prioritize what we see?
It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. A new study by a team of neuroscientists has discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images.

Analyzing the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
The Guadalquivir estuary showed the highest density of early stages fish and also of macro-zooplankton (fish prey). A higher concentration of organic matter (preferential food of the macrozooplanton in the Guadalquivir), provided by a greater flow of fresh water and correlated with total suspended solids, inorganic matter and turbidity, were the most typical characteristics of the Guadalquivir.

Strict diet explains metabolic effect of gastric bypass surgery
In many studies, bariatric surgery has been highlighted as an almost magical method for weight loss and reversing type 2 diabetes. One question that has remained largely unanswered is how the effect of surgery differs from the effects of a strict low-calorie diet. This question has now been examined by researchers at Lund University in Sweden in a study published in the journal Diabetes.

Global deaths due to smokeless tobacco are up by a third, according to new study
The number of deaths globally due to smokeless tobacco has gone up by a third in 7 years to an estimated 350,000 people, a new study suggests.

EULAR: Amputations of body parts: The combination of diabetes and gout significantly increases
Compared to the average population, people suffering from both gout and diabetes have a 25 times higher risk of requiring an amputation of peripheral limbs such as feet, toes or lower legs. This is the result of a study presented by experts from the US at the virtual annual congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2020.

Spread of monsoon circulation changes explains uncertainty in global land monsoon precipitation projection
A new study emphasizes the importance of reliable prediction of circulation changes, to ensure that future projections of global land monsoon are suitable for use by policy makers.

Independent search engines respect your privacy but give more visibility to misinformation
Anti-vaccine websites, which could play a key role in promoting public hesitancy about a potential COVID vaccine, are far more likely to be found via independent search engines than through an internet giant like Google.

Employers reject transgender people
Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people -- especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics.

A new, 20-minute assay for COVID-19 diagnosis
Researchers have developed a new test that can diagnose COVID-19 in just 20 minutes. The findings, published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology, show the rapid molecular test called N1-STOP-LAMP, is 100% accurate in diagnosing samples containing SARS-CoV-2 at high loads.

Strianassa lerayi anker, new shrimp species from Panama's Coiba national park
Last year's expedition, part of the project to compare microbiomes of animals in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, resulted in the discovery of several new animal genera and a species of mud shrimp named for STRI and post-doctoral fellow, Matt Leray

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision.

​NTU Singapore scientists develop artificial intelligence system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision.

Perovskite and organic solar cells prove successful on a rocket flight in space
Almost all satellites are powered by solar cells - but solar cells are heavy. While conventional high-performance cells reach up to three watts of electricity per gram, perovskite and organic hybrid cells could provide up to ten times that amount. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has now tested this type of cell in space for the first time.

Study finds cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links.

NUS research breakthrough: CircASXL1-1 regulates BAP1 deubiquitinase activity in leukemia
Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified covalently closed circular RNAs (circRNAs) from key genes involved in leukemia development and provided greater understanding of their roles in haematological malignancies.

Who's your daddy? Male seahorses transport nutrients to embryos
New research by Dr Camilla Whittington and her team at the University of Sydney has found male seahorses transport nutrients to their developing babies during pregnancy. This discovery provides an opportunity for further comparative evolutionary research.

Virus uses decoy strategy to evade immune system, Otago research reveals
University of Otago researchers have learnt more about how viruses operate and can evade the immune system and are now using their discovery to help learn more about COVID-19.

'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
Researchers show that 'Madsen,' a commonly used wheat variety, is resistant to more pests and diseases than recently thought, making it a good source of genes for breeding better wheat.

Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology.

Research gets to the heart of organ shape in nature
Researchers have shed fresh light on the evolution and function of the shapes we see in nature - using as a model the heart shaped fruits of the Capsella genus.

Delaying prostate cancer radiation therapy offers room for flexibility in pandemic peak
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that for men with unfavorable intermediate-risk or high-risk localized prostate cancer, who are receiving radiation and hormone therapy, delaying radiation while remaining on hormone therapy is unlikely to impact survival.

Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old.

A new neurofeedback strategy to treat pain
Researchers in Japan and Cambridge have developed a new neurofeedback strategy that might help to treat patients who suffer from chronic pain in the future. They have shown that they can use neurofeedback to boost the brain's natural ability to control pain, in a simple procedure in which people lie in a brain scanner and have their brain activity decoded using AI techniques.

Diabetes, weight change and pancreatic cancer risk
Researchers investigated an association between the duration of diabetes and recent weight loss with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer in this observational study.

Outcomes associated with kinin B2 receptor antagonist for treatment of COVID-19
The association between receipt of the bradykinin 2 (B2) receptor antagonist icatibant and improved oxygenation in patients with COVID-19 is investigated in this study.

Disparities in cancer outcomes due to COVID-19
This Viewpoint calls for greater attention to racial and socioeconomic health disparities affecting patients with cancer in the setting of COVID-19.

Radiotherapy, androgen deprivation timing and implications for prostate cancer treatment during COVID-19
National Cancer Database data from 2004 to 2014 were used to examine the association between overall survival and timing of radiotherapy relative to androgen deprivation therapy in patients with prostate cancer.

Evidence of direct viral damage to olfactory complex in patients testing positive for SARS-CoV-2
Researchers report the clinicopathologic and autopsy findings observed in the olfactory system of two patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive nasal swabs.

COVID-19 outcomes in french nursing homes with staff confinement
COVID-19-related outcomes in French nursing homes that implemented voluntary staff confinement with residents are investigated in this study.

Comparing excess deaths in New York during COVID-19 with 1918 influenza pandemic
Excess deaths in New York during the peak of the 1918 influenza pandemic were compared with those during the initial period of the COVID-19 outbreak in this study.

'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses -- and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say.

Radiation to treat pediatric cancers may have lasting impact on heart and metabolic health
Adult survivors of childhood abdominal and pelvic cancers who had been treated with radiation therapy experienced abnormalities in body composition and had worse cardiometabolic health compared with the general population.

Food-based approach to lowering cholesterol provides significant healthcare cost savings
A new study is the first to show a food-based approach using clinically-proven diet interventions to lower cholesterol levels, such as Step One Foods®, provides significant healthcare cost savings.

Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal -- study
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help "nudge" diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias. Findings are the latest from Cambridge research on encouraging dietary decision-making that supports sustainable living.

Palaeontology: 429-million-year-old eye provides a view of trilobite life
The internal structure of a 429-million-year-old fossilized trilobite eye is almost identical to that of modern bees, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that the principles of vision in many insects and crustaceans today are at least half a billion years old.

Breast cancer 'ecosystem' reveals possible new targets for treatment
Garvan researchers have used cellular genomics to uncover promising therapy targets for triple negative breast cancer.

Sex, flies and videotape
Researchers discover key behaviour that triggers the transition from courtship to mating in fruit flies.

Waistline matters in kidney disease
Does fat matter in kidney disease? The investigators found that all measures of higher abdominal fat content (including visceral fat, liver fat, or subcutaneous fat) and slower walk times were associated with increased levels of cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with non-dialysis dependent kidney disease. These data highlight that abdominal fat measures and lower physical fitness levels are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in adults with non-dialysis dependent kidney disease. Waist circumference may be a new vital sign.

Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting
Although overhunting led to the demise of some prehistoric megafauna after the last ice age, a study appearing August 13 in the journal Current Biology found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have been caused by climate change. By sequencing ancient DNA from 14 woolly rhinos, researchers found that their population remained stable and diverse until only a few thousand years before it disappeared from Siberia, when temperatures likely rose too high.

Landmark paper calls for need to develop the world's microbiome biobanking infrastructure
A team of scientists, led by CABI's Dr Matthew Ryan, have outlined a series of challenges and opportunities presented in a necessary review of how microbiomes - biological communities including bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae, protists and viruses - can be 'banked' and preserved for generations to come.

Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Vision is essential for the survival of most animal species and tears provide potentially life-saving protection for the eyes. A new first-of-its-kind study looks at the composition of bird and reptile tears and compares these findings to human tears. These results provide clues about tear evolution, as well as potential starting points for better eye treatments.

Sea-level rise could make rivers more likely to jump course
A new study shows that sea level rise will cause rivers to change course more frequently.

Singapore researchers discover genetic link to predict positive response to immunotherapy in patient
Findings offer cost and clinical benefits for patients with natural-killer T-cell lymphoma undergoing novel anti PD-1 therapy. Findings published in high impact factor journal, Leukemia. Discovery licensed to Singapore biotech company, Lucence Diagnostics which has developed diagnostic tests for clinical application.

Researchers make green chemistry advance with new catalyst for reduction of carbon dioxide
Researchers have made a key advance in the green chemistry pursuit of converting the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into reusable forms of carbon via electrochemical reduction.

Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. Matt Richie, an assistant criminal justice professor, recently published 'Managing the Rabble with Dignity and Respect,' in the Journal of Crime and Justice, a publication of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association. His findings reveal a great deal of the work involves interpersonal communication skills rather than physical force.

Maternal obesity and the risk of early-onset hypertensive disorders of pregnancy
Pregnant obese women were more at risk of experiencing early and late-onset hypertensive disorders, and that risk progressively increased in women with higher body mass indexes (BMI), according to a study led by researchers at UTHealth.

The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain.

New super-resolution method reveals fine details without constantly needing to zoom in
Since the early 1930s, electron microscopy has provided unprecedented access to the alien world of the extraordinarily small, revealing intricate details that are otherwise impossible to discern with conventional light microscopy. But to achieve high resolution over a large specimen area, the energy of the electron beams needs to be cranked up, which is costly and detrimental to the specimen under observation.

Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
A preliminary analysis of an ongoing study of more than 300 COVID-19 patients treated with convalescent plasma therapy at Houston Methodist suggests the treatment is safe and effective. The results, published in The American Journal of Pathology, represent one of the first peer-reviewed publications in the country assessing efficacy of convalescent plasma and offer valuable scientific evidence that transfusing critically ill COVID-19 patients with high antibody plasma early in their illness reduced the mortality rate.

Coastal flooding study finds trust-building, power-sharing key for environmental justice
It took two years and $11 million, but eventually ranchers, politicians and scientists came to a consensus about how to prevent flooding in Tillamook, a coastal Oregon town. A recent study by Portland State University researchers examined the social factors involved in this decision-making process. This study showcases how environmental justice can be served when affected parties have a seat at the table.

New study suggests ADHD- like behavior helps spur entrepreneurial activity
Many people have experienced a few nights of bad sleep that resulted in shifting attention spans, impulsive tendencies and hyperactivity the next day -- all behaviors resembling ADHD. A new study found that this dynamic may also be linked to increased entrepreneurial behavior.

Public health consequences of policing homelessness
In a new study examining homelessness, researchers find that policy such a lifestyle has massive public health implications, making sleeping on the street even MORE unhealthy.

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Researchers found a striking association between BMI and risk for death among patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19. The association was independent of obesity-related comorbities and other potential confounders. Their findings also suggest that high BMI was more strongly associated with COVID-19 mortality in younger adults and male patients, but not in female patients and older adults. A retrospective cohort study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Purdue University researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samples of bacteria.

Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
A group led by UC Riverside bioengineering professor Victor G. J. Rodgers and UC Riverside School of Medicine professor Devin Binder has created an osmotic therapy device that gently removes fluid from the spinal cord to reduce swelling in injured rats with good results. The device can eventually be scaled up for testing in humans.

Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells
Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body. Through powerful application of the foundational sciences and bioinformatic analysis their research highlights key characteristics of the virus that could one day be important in the development of a treatment for COVID-19.

New generation of drugs show early efficacy against drug-resistant TB
New drug regimen for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis shows early effectiveness in 85 percent of patients in a cohort including many with serious comorbidities. The results suggest a global need for expanded access to two recently developed medicines, bedaquiline and delamanid. Study cohort included many people who would have been excluded from trials because of comorbidities, severity of disease or extent of drug resistance. Findings highlight the importance of innovative regimens to improve outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

Lack of females in drug dose trials leads to overmedicated women
Women are more likely than men to suffer adverse side effects of medications because drug dosages have historically been based on clinical trials conducted on men, suggests new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Chicago.

Zeroing out their own zap
African fish called mormyrids communicate using pulses of electricity. New research from biologists in Arts & Sciences shows that a time-shifted signal in the brain helps the fish to ignore their own pulse. This skill has co-evolved with large and rapid changes in these signals across species.

Searching the ancient depths of a reptilian genome yields insight into all vertebrates
An Iowa State University scientists contributed to a global effort to assemble the genome of the tuatara, a rare reptile species native to New Zealand. The tuatara genome sheds light on the genomic structure of a huge range of species, including humans.

Mutations may have saved brown howlers from yellow fever virus
From 2007 to 2009, a devastating yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated brown and black and gold howler monkey populations at El Parque El Piñalito in northeastern Argentina. An international research team tested if howlers who survived the outbreak had any genetic variations that may have kept them alive. In brown howlers, they found two mutations on immune genes that resulted in amino acid changes in the part of the protein that detects the disease.

'Reelin' in a new treatment for multiple sclerosis
In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the amount of a protein made in the liver significantly protected against development of the disease's characteristic symptoms and promoted recovery in symptomatic animals, UTSW scientists report.

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.

No increased skin cancer risk with topical immunosuppressant ointments
Two topical immunosuppressant medications commonly prescribed to treat skin conditions do not appear to increase the risk for the most common forms of skin cancer, despite package label warnings to the contrary.

Study provides insights into how Zika virus suppresses the host immune system
A research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has outlined how the Zika virus, which constituted an epidemic threat in 2016, suppresses the immune system of its host. The work provides valuable structural and functional information on the interaction between ZIKV and its host and offers a framework for the development of vaccines and antivirals.

Combination therapy improves survival outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia
A combination regimen of venetoclax and azacitidine was safe and improved overall survival (OS) over azacitidine alone in certain patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to the Phase III VIALE-A trial led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Programmed bacteria have something extra
Rice University chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a "noncanonical amino acid" that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs.

Short-term use of HIV-prevention medication protects at-risk men on vacation
Men at particular risk for HIV are very likely to consistently take prevention medication during vacations when their odds of contracting the virus are higher, according to a new study. The findings indicate that short-term use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication could be a highly successful way to prevent the spread of HIV in men who have sex with men and have difficulty with long-term PrEP use. It may also work to transition men to long-term PrEP use.

Young children would rather explore than get rewards
Young children will pass up rewards they know they can collect to explore other options, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when adults and 4- to 5-year-old children played a game where certain choices earned them rewards, both adults and children quickly learned what choices would give them the biggest returns. But while adults then used that knowledge to maximize their prizes, children continued exploring the other options.

Impact of family income on learning in children shaped by hippocampus in brain
A new study by a team of researchers at the University of Toronto identifies the region of the brain's hippocampus that links low income with decreased memory and language ability in children. The research shows it is the anterior hippocampus that is associated with differences in cognition related to income.

Stay-at-home orders significantly associated with reduced spread of COVID-19, study finds
As COVID-19 swept across the nation, most states went into lockdown -- new research and state-by-state data suggests that stay-at-home orders helped slow the pandemic significantly.

Some dinosaurs could fly before they were birds
New research using the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds has revised the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds. An international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson published their findings in the journal Current Biology. The team pored over fossils, developed a novel analytical pipeline to search for evolutionary trees, and estimated how each species may have crossed the stringent thresholds for powered flight.

Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons
Up to one-third of physicians reported sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by clinical care guidelines, a new study led by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers finds. Routine use of ultrasounds to detect cancerous thyroid nodules have led to a significant increase in thyroid cancer cases in recent years, although many are low-risk and unlikely to cause serious harm.

Unlocking how cellular proteins control cancer spread
A new insight into cell signals that control cancer growth and migration could help in the search for effective anti-cancer drugs. A McGill-led study reveals key biochemical processes that advance our understanding of colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer among Canadians.

NASA finds hurricane Elida's eye covered
NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery of Hurricane Elida in the Eastern Pacific as it continued to weaken. Imagery revealed that Elida's eye had become covered as the storm embarks on a weakening trend over cooler waters.

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. This review examines the behavioral responses to emerging diseases across the animal kingdom from frogs and wolves to lobsters, bats, and humans. The paper also addresses whether or not technology helps when it comes to dealing with humans and social distancing.

Demographics data helps predict NY flood insurance claims
In flood-prone areas of the Hudson River valley in New York state, census areas with more white and affluent home owners tend to file a higher percentage of flood insurance claims than lower-income, minority residents, according to a new study.

First in Human Study with Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide
A single intravenous dose of MRG-110, an anti-microRNA drug, significantly reduced miR-92a levels in the blood of healthy humans.

Research Finds Women Often Overprescribed Opioids After Childbirth
Excessive opioid prescriptions following childbirth may lead to higher rates of addiction within communities, according to a new report in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

Early spread of COVID-19 appears far greater than initially reported
Patients with undiagnosed flu symptoms who actually had COVID-19 last winter were among thousands of undetected early cases of the disease at the beginning of this year. In a new paper in The Lancet's open-access journal EClinicalMedicine, epidemiological researchers from The University of Texas at Austin estimated COVID-19 to be far more widespread in Wuhan, China, and Seattle, Washington, weeks ahead of lockdown measures in each city.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds a stubborn tropical depression 06W
Tropical Depression 06W has been around for days, and continues to hold together as it moves in a westerly direction toward Taiwan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the storm.

Group produces materials via self-organization in chemical systems
Applications range from sensors and batteries to fuel cells, among other technological possibilities. Achieving a deeper understanding and control of the processes involved is the goal of the Campinas Electrochemistry Group.

Soldiers could teach future robots how to outperform humans
In the future, a Soldier and a game controller may be all that's needed to teach robots how to outdrive humans.

After Stillbirth, New Genetic Analyses May Give Parents Answers
Columbia researchers have uncovered an array of new genes that cause stillbirth, significantly increasing the understanding of the genetic foundations of common, but little studied, condition.

Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game
To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring -- a change likely to continue for many this fall. As a result, hands-on chemistry labs are no longer accessible to undergraduate students. In a new study in the Journal of Chemical Education, researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in which teams solve chemistry problems to progress and 'escape.'

Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions
Given current events, many people are wearing face masks to protect themselves and others. But that same face mask could someday also collect useful health information. Researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disease biomarkers on a large scale.

New Analysis Reveals Worsening Shortage of Emergency Physicians in Rural Areas
Despite the nation's growing reliance on emergency departments, large areas of rural America are experiencing shortages emergency physicians, according to a new emergency medicine workforce analysis in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Significantly improved COVID-19 outcomes in countries with higher TB vaccination coverage
The researchers discovered that BCG regimes are associated with better COVID-19 outcomes, both in reducing infection rates and death rates per million, especially for ages 24 or younger who had received the vaccination in the last 15 years. There was no effect among older adults who had received the BCG vaccine. Many countries have stopped inoculating their entire population, but some still use BCG widely.

Paper: Industry concentration contributes to job quality erosion, wage stagnation
Dominant firms in concentrated industries can play a role in job quality erosion and wage stagnation for U.S. workers, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Richard Benton and U. of I. graduate student Ki-Jung Kim.

Yale quantum researchers create an error-correcting cat
Yale physicists have developed an error-correcting cat -- a new device that combines the Schrödinger's cat concept of superposition (a physical system existing in two states at once) with the ability to fix some of the trickiest errors in a quantum computation.

New nitrogen products are in the air
A nifty move with nitrogen has brought the world one step closer to creating a range of useful products -- from dyes to pharmaceuticals -- out of thin air.

Stress and anger may exacerbate heart failure
Mental stress and anger may have clinical implications for patients with heart failure according to a new report published in the Journal of Cardiac Failure.

Selective conversion of reactive lithium compounds made possible
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new catalyst that can catalyse reactions to produce pharmaceuticals or chemicals used in agriculture. It creates carbon-carbon bonds between what are known as organolithium compounds without creating any unwanted by-products.

Adaptation in single neurons provides memory for language processing
To understand language, we have to remember the words that were uttered and combine them into an interpretation. How does the brain retain information long enough to accomplish this, despite the fact that neuronal firing events are very short-lived? Hartmut Fitz from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and his colleagues propose a neurobiological explanation bridging this discrepancy. Neurons change their spike rate based on experience and this adaptation provides memory for sentence processing.

Porous liquids allow for efficient gas separation
Jointly with partners, a researcher of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has developed 'porous liquids': Nanoparticles, that are able to separate gas molecules of different sizes from each other, float - finely distributed - in a solvent. The porous liquids may be processed into membranes that efficiently separate propene from gaseous mixtures. This could replace the energy-intensive distillation that has been the common procedure up to now. (Nature Materials, DOI: 10.1038/s41563-020-0764-y).

Spider silk inspires new class of functional synthetic polymers
Synthetic polymers have changed the world around us. However, It is hard to finely tune some of their properties, such as the ability to transport ions. To overcome this problem, assistant professor Giuseppe Portale decided to take inspiration from nature and created a new class of polymers based on protein-like materials that work as proton conductors and might be useful in future bio-electronic devices.

Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat
The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance.

Nutrition labelling is improving nation's diet - new study
Households eat more healthily when retailers display clear nutritional information on own-brand food products, say researchers.

 

newsletter


Copyright 2020 Arellon.com. All Rights Reserved.
 Sitemap | Bigcommerce Premium Themes by PSDCenter